Thursday, July 23, 2009

Daytonology Two Year Anniversary

Back in January there was this post, announcing yer humble hosts impending departure from Dayton and the closure of this blog.

The move is on hiatus due to the dire job situation but the blog is done. Daytonology has been running on empty for quite a while now, so this two year anniversary (the first posts were during July 2007) is as good a time as any to close the blog. Two to three years is the average life span of a blog, too.

Since there are things linking here the blog will be online for a few more months. This will give people who surf in time to remove links if they have any (if other bloggers are like me they periodically check their link roll and cull dead links).

Come December the delete button will be pushed and this blog will finally disappear into the ether.

18 comments:

Joe said...

Ah! Sorry to see you go. Are you really going to delete all this work? Any chance of making a .pdf download of all this work? This is a valuable resource. Thanks again for all the great posts.

Brian said...

like Joe said, this is/was great stuff and should be saved. Thanks for all of your hard work and in depth research the last two years. You've really helped me understand Dayton better.

Anonymous said...

I agree! This is an amazing slice of history and you've done great work. If you must quit, please don't delete it!

There are still many stories to tell.

scartwr408 said...

Personally, I think you should take all the analysis you've done and put it into a book. You've covered quite a lot of American history, society, economics, whatever, all in terms of a not untypical city. By organizing the work you've already done you may find still more overarching trends and, more importantly, pointers towards the future.

scartwr408 said...

Personally, I think you should take all the analysis you've done and put it into a book. You've covered quite a lot of American history, society, economics, whatever, all in terms of a not untypical city. By organizing the work you've already done you may find still more overarching trends and, more importantly, pointers towards the future.

scartwr408 said...

And with a book you wouldn't have to put up with people who push the "Post" button twice.

Anonymous said...

Jefferey, thank you for the research and postings you have published. As a lifelong resident of the area, I have found your posts to be fair, interesting and informative. Things I knew and didn't know were worth the time to read. I am disappointed that I will not have 'Daytonolgy' to check every day. Good luck in your future endeavors.

Patrick

cjfjapan said...

Thanks for all the great posts about Dayton. I learned a great deal, and hope you will consider finding a permanent home for your articles. Future Daytonologists will benefit greatly from your work.

Mike Bock said...

Jefferey, Sorry to hear that you are closing up shop at Daytonology. You’ve put together a lot of great articles. I've been proud that your web-site has been syndicated at DaytonOS. http://daytonos.com/ Thanks.

I think it is a wonderful idea that you organize your material into book form. Just for the fun of it I put together a little book from some of my articles and used a web-site called Lulu http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/why-you-are-not-entitled-to-your-opinion/5312875

I like the name you chose for your site -- Daytonology -- the study of Dayton. One thing is for certain, there’s a lot about the Dayton area to study, a lot to understand. You've added a lot. One topic that I think deserves a lot more attention, in order to gain understanding about Dayton, is the state of democracy in Dayton.

My basic premise is that the stronger the democracy, the better the society and the weaker the democracy, the worse the society. I believe the reason our society is in trouble is because our democracy is weak.

The theme of democracy, I believe, deserves a lot of attention, but yet it is a theme rarely dealt with in mainstream media in any educative way. The pillars of our democracy are crumbling, yet no one seems to think the startling evidence of such crumbling is very newsworthy. If vitalizing our democracy was somehow in the interest of corporations and the powerful, it would be important to the media as well. The fact is, many powerful interests feel it is in their interest to suppress democracy.

As an experienced researcher I would interested to know how you would proceed to answer the question: How strong is Dayton’s democracy?

Gina said...

Please don't delete all this! Put it in a book, or in some permanent online form. Your research and commentary are fantastic. It would be a shame for it to disappear.

"TheDonald" said...

This is yet another vote in favor of leaving this material up indefinitely.

Also huge kudos for the large amount of research that you put into these posts (especially the analyses.) It may not be at the level of scholarly research, but it's damned good overview material.

And yes, consider self-publishing this material through Lulu or another self publishing house. Or at least create a PDF of the contents. If Drexel Dave can do it with Therealdaytonohio blog, then so can you! :)

scartwr408 said...

Would you consider one last post? Would you please write about how you did your research--where you found maps, photos, etc; how to determine the ownership and history of a building; that sort of thing. I think many of us would like to follow your example but aren't quite sure where to start.

Anonymous said...

Hi Jeffrey. I am a Dayton native who moved to Maine nearly 20 yrs. ago. Wanted to let you know that I have appreciated all the work you did with this blog...like others, I have learned alot about Dayton and indeed the Miami Valley by reading and by seeing the photos/illustrations. Hope someone else can pick it up somewheres. KUDOS!......-Jim G.

Matt said...

Thanks for the great posts, great reporting, great research (I'll be taking a statistics/research class in the fall and can't believe I'll ever be interested in doing all the work that it takes to pull together the information you've shared with us).

You've been a tremendous resource, a true Dayton fan, and a great role model in the local blogosphere.

I echo everyone else who wants to see the work stay. Maybe since Blogger is free you could just walk away from it and leave it?

Best wishes!

David Esrati said...

Jeffrey,
Sorry you are hanging it up.
But, why do you feel you have to delete it? Sure, Bock has a lot of it on DaytonOS.com but, there is a lot of stuff I'd like to go back and read- and I have a lot of links to your stuff as well.
I hope you reconsider.
I learned a lot from you.

Julie said...

This is a valuable resource. Thanks again for all the great posts.
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Julie
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Moderator said...

Sorry to hear about this.

I'm thinking that we need to start with the small scale stuff - support more blogs like this one (Streetsblog Detroit, anyone?) and use new websites like SeeClickFix.com that allow citizens, govt, advocates and media to collaborate on getting things fixed & improving the quality of life.

Cities need to be more efficient and more livable if they are going to come back.

Anonymous said...

The city of Dayton has been running on empty for over twenty years.